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  /  Posts tagged "Creative Practice"

The binding time course just finished at Maiwa School of Textiles. I know this because I was one of the 14 women attending! It was my first class at Maiwa, but I will be back. Browse through the website to

What is a creativity blog, anyway? That is an interesting question. One which has taken deep study to realize how best to communicate. Getting it down to the elevator pitch, you know the 15 seconds you have to answer the dreaded 'what do you do'? I suppose this is important in tricky situations, particularly if you are dealing with someone who has the attention span of a nat. Maybe this graphic will help. Basically this is a 'journey map', an overview of the ways to discover and benefit from the content of this creative blog. There are 3 silos running vertically which represent the main categories, with 2 special ones off on each edge.

I am wondering what specific activities people consider creative? Where are the areas of focus? Is there a cluster of common practices or is it quite individual? Question #3 from my survey; this one is super interesting. When I put up the multiple choice answers, I focused on the things I was most interested in at the moment. I was curious to see the other ways people practice a creative spirit. (Maybe I should have phrased it that way!) In any case, the comments reflect many other activities and even, "ways of being" which are self defined as creative. I love it. Just the spirit I was hoping for. Of the pre-selected, limited choices the top 3 picks are as follows:

  • 58% for DIY, home improvement projects
  • 51% for Drawing, colouring or doodling
  • 47% for Photography

E-book - Fruitless at 40: Rediscovering my Creative Power I am not fruitless anymore. Through the writing, learning and practicing of the past 6 years, I have come out the other side with more wisdom, creativity and passion than I knew was possible. I know I am not alone in this type of transformation. Everyone who enters the decade of being the age of 40 comes through it changed. I didn't realize how much better I would feel and how much more I like myself as I move through these transitions.

A couple of years ago, one of my New Years resolutions was to start meditating. Even back then, everyone seemed to be talking about the amazingly restorative powers of meditation. But how was I going to accomplish this? The first quarter is a very heavy travel season for me at work. Almost immediately after the Christmas holidays end, I am off on my first long haul flight of the year. I found a resource through the Tim Ferris podcast. Her name is Tara Brach. I love the timber of her voice. I was calmed by her guided meditation and felt good when I was finished. I could easily commit to a 20 minute session from my hotel room. That is the only upside of travelling alone. No extra responsibilities. Early on in my practice, one of Tara's meditations used the following passage from Rumi. I liked this so much, I wrote it out from the podcast audio. (I didn't realize I could just google a few of the lines and have the poem instantly).

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there. When the soul lies down in that grass, the world is too full to talk about. Ideas, language, even the phrase each other doesn't make any sense. - Rumi, Sufi poet

If a child was asked what their superpower was, they would wonder why they had to pick just one?  Children can easily convey their strengths, listing them off one by one. They would not feel too boastful about honestly declaring their passions. They wouldn't worry what the person who asked the question thought about their unique superpowers. This child might even think it ridiculous to worry about such things. At what age did we loose the ability to easily identify what makes us feel special? Why is naming our valuable contributions to the world such a vulnerable process?